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Q&A… Bike Cornering:


Wes: I want to purchase a bike and I am wondering if I should take into consideration a certain type of frame geometry?

Of course some bikes, depending on the frame geometry, turn better around corners than others. Typically, road geometry corners better than tri geometry. With tri geometry, your body is a little more forward. The handlebars typical of many tri bikes may add to some instability when cornering compared to standard drop bars. However, for the most part, it doesn't matter what bike you are riding, turning is fairly universal. When cornering, lean the bike into the turn, not the body. This way, if you over steer, you can bring the bike back. If you lean into a turn with your body, it is much harder to bring your body back upright with gravity pulling it down. Also, place pressure on the pedal by the foot on that is on the outside of the turn. This will help you maintain stability. If you notice accomplished cyclists, their inside leg is bent while the outside leg is pressing on the pedal. For example, if you are making a left hand turn. The right foot should be straighter and placing pressure on that pedal.

Cornering in triathlons is a minimal part of the bike segment. Base your selection on what your A races plan to be in the future. Will they be flat or hilly races? Also, do your train more in the hills or the flats. This is where comfort plays a role in your bike selection.

 
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